Nobody made Potato Salad like Grandma Bauman…
But we try, and YOU can, too!

I don’t have a clue on the history or origins of cold potato salad, but this dish has somehow, through the course of time, become an icon of summer gatherings.

Unfortunately, the frequency of serving baked beans and potato salad has degraded the dish. Cooks slap it together and people consume it as a matter of course, not because of a fondness of flavor.

But when a cook goes through the effort to make a really “WOW” potato salad or baked bean dish, it eclipses its designation as a  side dish and begins competing with the classic barbecue stars like the burgers and sausages.

I have the privilege of growing up tasting just such a WOW Potato Salad that gets as much acclaim as the meats!

When the extended Bauman family gathered, the only potato salad was the one that Grandma made. On the few occasions when Grandma dared to bring something besides the potato salad or one of her Top Five Celebrated Recipes, she would hear comments like “that’s delicious Jello, but we sure missed `The Potato Salad!”

[You know your recipe is a good one when folks refer to it as a proper noun and not as a recipe with adjectives!]

While all the women in the family had Grandma’s recipe, no one dared to bring it to a family gathering instead of Grandma, because you just knew that everyone would have though that it didn’t taste as good as Grandma’s Potato Salad!

We only made our version of  Grandma’s Potato Salad when we were having a meal where Grandma wasn’t present. And when compliments were received one always knew better than to claim the credit, as the only fitting reply was: “Thank you! It’s Grandma Bauman’s potato salad recipe!”

Our family and church fellowship looks for any excuse to gather and bring food: Mother’s Day picnics, visitor potlucks, Sunday evening singings,  if it’s not been turned into an event to fellowship, it soon will be. Our church potlucks aren’t complete without a bowl of potato salad either. That ubiquitous potato salad appeared on the laden tables, and one of the bowls was most likely made by my Grandma.

The same thing goes for our annual Bauman Family Camping. It isn’t complete without Grandma’s Potato Salad.

I don’t have a clue on the history or origins of cold potato salad, but this dish has somehow, through the course of time, become an icon of summer gatherings.

Unfortunately, the frequency of serving baked beans and potato salad has degraded the dish. Cooks slap it together and people consume it as a matter of course, not because of a fondness of flavor.

But when a cook goes through the effort to make a really “WOW” potato salad or baked bean dish, it eclipses its designation as a  side dish and begins competing with the classic barbecue stars like the burgers and sausages.

I have the privilege of growing up tasting just such a WOW Potato Salad that gets as much acclaim as the meats!

When the extended Bauman family gathered, the only potato salad was the one that Grandma made. On the few occasions when Grandma dared to bring something besides the potato salad or one of her Top Five Celebrated Recipes, she would hear comments like “that’s delicious Jello, but we sure missed `The Potato Salad!”

[You know your recipe is a good one when folks refer to it as a proper noun and not as a recipe with adjectives!]

While all the women in the family had Grandma’s recipe, no one dared to bring it to a family gathering instead of Grandma, because you just knew that everyone would have though that it didn’t taste as good as Grandma’s Potato Salad!

We only made our version of  Grandma’s Potato Salad when we were having a meal where Grandma wasn’t present. And when compliments were received one always knew better than to claim the credit, as the only fitting reply was: “Thank you! It’s Grandma Bauman’s potato salad recipe!”

Our family and church fellowship looks for any excuse to gather and bring food: Mother’s Day picnics, visitor potlucks, Sunday evening singings,  if it’s not been turned into an event to fellowship, it soon will be. Our church potlucks aren’t complete without a bowl of potato salad either. That ubiquitous potato salad appeared on the laden tables, and one of the bowls was most likely made by my Grandma.

The same thing goes for our annual Bauman Family Camping. It isn’t complete without Grandma’s Potato Salad.

Grandma Bauman’s Shredded ‘WOW’ Potato Salad

Part of the reason this potato salad is so well liked is because the flavors blend so well. Other potato salads are prettier, with those beautiful cubes of new red potatoes, golden hunks of egg yolks, and chunks of crispy pickles.

The problem with those pretty salads is that you get a bit of potato – and sometimes it’s a dry potato, then a bite of pickle, and a separate bite of egg.

But when Grandma shreds and minced her ingredients, the flavors blended so much better so that you taste the true potato salad not the individual ingredients.

Grandma also used sweet pickles instead of dill in her salad, which gave it a bit more of a mellow taste than the classic dill. The Bauman family are huge fans of dill pickles, there’s hardly a family gathering that pickles are not a part of, so simply the fact that Grandma could use sweet instead of dill pickles in her recipe says a lot about how well the sweet pickles pair with the potato salad.

And the pickle juice…one must NEVER forget to add the pickle juice to the salad or the whole flavor is off.

And then, of course, it just wouldn’t taste like Grandma’s Potato Salad!

INGREDIENTS

Salad
6 pounds of potatoes
2 stalks of celery, chopped fine
1 small onion, chopped fine
3 boiled eggs, shredded
3 big sweet pickles, shredded

Dressing
2 cups mayonnaise (1/2 jar)
½ cup milk
½ cup sweet pickle juice
¾ teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon prepared mustard
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon salt

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Fill a four quart pan with whole potatoes (approximately 6 pounds or 14 potatoes).
  2. Boil until tender.
  3. Cool.
  4. Peel the skins off if desired and shred with a medium-hole shredder (not fine, about hashed brown thickness).
  5. Add in all other ingredients and combine until uniformly combined.
  6. In a separate bowl blend together the dressing before stirring it into the potato mixture.

TIP: If the salad is dry add a bit more pickle juice.

TIP: For the best flavor refrigerate over night or for 8 hours.

Cottage Bacon Cheeseburger with Pickled Red Onions

We took inspiration from the mouthwatering Pickled Onion Bacon Burger over on the SCHWEID & SONS blog. We’ll wait while you go and check it out.

But you know us, we have to put a little Bauman spin on even this amazing recipe. . .

Instead of bacon, we suggest subbing in BAUMAN’S COTTAGE BACON.

Cottage Bacon is made out of the nicely marbled Butt Roast. We inject it with our plant-based cure (not chemical nitrates!) and then put it in a press to compact the roast into firm bacon while it slowly smokes in our hickory smokehouse. That’s why you won’t see Pork Butt Roasts for sale in our Mobile Meat Market – we turn them all into Cottage Bacon!

You can read all about our BAUMAN’S COTTAGE BACON HERE.

And we LOVE the QUICK PICKLED RED ONIONS recipe shared by Ali on her Gimme Some Oven blog!

Ali’s recipe has only four ingredients and is super versatile! Here’s what she has to say:

Pickled red onions of course taste fabulous with just about any traditional Mexican dishes, from tacos to burritos, soups, salads, nachos, chilaquiles, and more. (Yum. ♡) But beyond Mexican food, pickled red onions can also liven up everything from burgers to curries, pizza to falafel, eggs to potato salad, and so much more. Basically anytime you need an extra pop of crispy, colorful, tangy goodness to balance out your dish, these quick pickled red onions are here for you, friends.

Simple Side Recipes

Tangy Carrot Slaw

Ridiculously Good Cucumber Salad

The Kitchen's Mom's Cucumber & Tomato Salad