Pekin Duck: A self-basting bird extraordinare

I’m not going to lie . . . Sometimes I feel like we ACTUALLY live on Old MacDonald’s Farm over here. Cows, pigs, chickens, turkeys, and ducks. With a moo-moo here. And a quack-quack, there. E-I-E-I-O. You get the idea. It can get a little crazy at chore time. But that’s the way us Baumans like it!

Our farm is diversified because, as a family, we all have diverse interests and skills.

At Cedar Valley Farms, my brother Steven is the Duck Champion. Since age 12, he has had his own little duck project.

Also . . . We love ducks because they’re cute! 🙂

Seriously! Doing chores is so much more fun when the animals you’re serving make you smile!

Steven raises his ducks on pasture (of course) and feeds them our own special duck grain that’s non-gmo & non-medicated (of course).

Being ducks, they also need a splash tub to clean themselves. Which, by the way, is a REALLY good reason to move them to fresh grass every day! Otherwise they would quickly have a pigsty!

And since Steven was raising meat ducks, that meant we needed to process them…. NOT an easy task!

Ducks take 4 times longer to butcher than a chicken, and yield the same amount of meat.

And did we mention that ducklings are also quadruple the price of chicks?

While ducks are more costly to raise, the end result: 100% dark, moist meat with a fat cover that self-bastes! The end result is worth it!

This is our only duck batch for the season, so grab yours now!

Pekin Duck: A self-basting bird extraordinare

I’m not going to lie . . . Sometimes I feel like we ACTUALLY live on Old MacDonald’s Farm over here. Cows, pigs, chickens, turkeys, and ducks. With a moo-moo here. And a quack-quack, there. E-I-E-I-O. You get the idea. It can get a little crazy at chore time. But that’s the way us Baumans like it!

Our farm is diversified because, as a family, we all have diverse interests and skills.

At Cedar Valley Farms, my brother Steven is the Duck Champion. Since age 12, he has had his own little duck project.

Also . . . We love ducks because they’re cute! 🙂

Seriously!

Doing chores is so much more fun when the animals you’re serving make you smile!

Steven raises his ducks on pasture (of course) and feeds them our own special duck grain that’s non-gmo & non-medicated (of course).

Being ducks, they also need a splash tub to clean themselves. Which, by the way, is a REALLY good reason to move them to fresh grass every day! Otherwise they would quickly have a pigsty!

And since Steven was raising meat ducks, that meant we needed to process them…. NOT an easy task!

Ducks take 4 times longer to butcher than a chicken, and yield the same amount of meat.

And did we mention that ducklings are also quadruple the price of chicks?

While ducks are more costly to raise, the end result: 100% dark, moist meat with a fat cover that self-bastes! The end result is worth it!

This is our only duck batch for the season, so grab yours now!

Pekin Duck Tips

We recommend thawing your Bauman’s Pekin Duck in the refrigerator overnight. Alternatively, you can thaw in a bowl with cold running water in about an hour.

Cut off wing tips with poultry shears or a sharp knife.

Remove and discard excess fat from body cavity and neck using poultry shears. Duck has such a generous layer of fat under the skin that this extra fat is unneeded.

Prick skin all over with a sharp fork, paring knife, or skewer. You don’t want to go too deep, but you want to provide an exit route for the extra fat as it renders.

Season inside and outside of duck with salt.

For super crispy skin, place the duck on a sheet pan and leave uncovered overnight in the fridge.

Pekin Duck Tips

We recommend thawing your Bauman’s Pekin Duck in the refrigerator overnight. Alternatively, you can thaw in a bowl with cold running water in about an hour.

Cut off wing tips with poultry shears or a sharp knife.

Remove and discard excess fat from body cavity and neck using poultry shears. Duck has such a generous layer of fat under the skin that this extra fat is unneeded.

Prick skin all over with a sharp fork, paring knife, or skewer. You don’t want to go too deep, but you want to provide an exit route for the extra fat as it renders.

Season inside and outside of duck with salt.

For super crispy skin, place the duck on a sheet pan and leave uncovered overnight in the fridge.

Pekin Duck Recipes

Grill Roasted Peking Duck

by Clint Cantwell of AmazingRibs.com

After reading Clint’s mouth-watering introduction to this recipe, we can’t wait to try it ourselves!
Click on over to read his Grill Roasted Peking Duck post and we’re sure you’ll want to make it, too.

Here’s your shopping list:

1 whole Bauman’s Pasture-raised Duck (approximately 5 pounds)

1/4 cup soy sauce
2 T rice wine vinegar
1 T honey
1/2 t Morton’s coarse kosher salt per pound of meat (learn more about the science of salt here)
1 t baking powder

Mandarin pancakes
Hoisin sauce
6 scallions, thinly sliced

Grill Roasted Peking Duck Recipe By Clint Cantwell

© PHOTO COURTESY of CLINT CANTWELL
Check out his recipes at AmazingRibs.com

PREPPING THE DUCK

Remove the giblets, neck, and sauce packet from the duck’s cavity.

Starting on the cavity side, gently work your fingers under the skin to separate the skin and flesh.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Set the duck on a rack in the sink and ladle the hot water over the duck to tighten the skin, flipping it halfway through the process.

Prick the skin of the duck all over with the tip of a paring knife or metal skewer to help the fat drain more easily.

Combine the soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, and honey in a microwave safe bowl and microwave on high for 15 seconds to liquefy the honey. Stir well to combine the ingredients. Brush the mixture all over the duck.

Combine the salt and baking powder in a small bowl. Mix well and sprinkle the mixture over the entire duck.

Refrigerate the duck uncovered on an elevated rack for at least six hours and up to overnight so that the skin can air dry.

PREPPING THE GRILL

Place a disposable aluminum roasting pan in the center of the grill’s charcoal grate to avoid flare-ups from dripping duck fat. Arrange hot briquets on both sides of the pan. Adjust the grill vents to bring the temperature to about 325°F. Add 2 to 3 chunks of your favorite smoking wood to the charcoal for flavor. If you’re using a gas grill, remove the main cooking grate and place a disposable aluminum pan on one side of the grill directly on top of the burner covers. Replace the main cooking grates and adjust the temperature knobs so that the side containing the aluminum pan (the indirect side) is off and the other side is heated enough to maintain a temperature of approximately 325°F on the indirect side.

GRILLING THE DUCK

Place the duck breast side up directly above the aluminum pan. Set the lid on the grill with the top vent fully open.

Allow the duck to roast for approximately 2 1/2 hours until the skin is golden brown and crispy and the internal temperature of the breast has reached 165°F.

SERVING THE DUCK

Remove the duck from the grill. Wrap the pancakes in a layer of moist paper towels and microwave for 15 seconds to warm them and to make them easier to separate. Thinly slice the duck and serve along with the pancakes, hoisin sauce, and green onion.

Pekin Duck Extras

On the Grill

In the Oven